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Tuesday, 03 January 2017 00:00

Changes to the ANSI A92 Standards

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Recap of the Pending ANSI/CSA Standards – Everything is Changing

Reposted from Aerial Pros Author Scott Owyen - Training Manager Genie Aerial Pros

ANSI (United States) and CSA (Canada) standards have, for almost four decades, provided best practices for safe, reliable access to work at height and have delivered a consistent benchmark for safe machine design in North America. Standards set a safety level for all participants in the market. Good standards also bring global markets closer together, driving commonality and stronger market competition.

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ANSI and CSA both require periodic updates to all standards. The updating process include a review of any ISO standards that apply to the products being addressed. Benefits from incorporating ISO concepts in the new ANSI/CSA standards include: North American aerial lift manufacturers, including Genie, will be more closely aligned with global markets like Europe, Australia and China.

These changes will allow aerial owners to more easily trade new and used equipment in many countries. due to increased world-wide commonality of aerials.

 When are the standards changing?
The new CSA B354 standards are expected to be finalized and published in Q1, 2017, and go into effect in early 2018.

The new ANSI A92 standards are expected to be finalized and published in Q2, 2017, and go into effect mid-2018.

Once the final standards are approved, all aerial equipment brands and manufacturers serving North American customers will have one year to comply.

What is changing?

  • Equipment Terminology
  • Equipment Design Standards
  • Safe Use and Planning
  • Risk Assessment Planning
  • Training (Operators, Supervisors & Occupants)
  • Maintenance and Repair Personnel Training

Equipment Terminology

Aerial Work Platforms (AWPs) will now become known as Mobile Elevating Work Platforms, or MEWPs. The word “mobile” is important because it means that the equipment can be driven, either under its own power or by manual effort; it is not stationary.

In previous iterations of the standards, AWPs were classified by product types, such as booms, scissors and so on. In the new standards, MEWP classifications are made up of a combination of two key distinguishing descriptions:

  1. a MEWP Group
  2. an associated MEWP Type

A MEWP Group is determined by the platform location in reference to the equipment’s tipping line, which is either at the wheels or the outriggers.

A Group A machine has a design that does not allow the main platform to extend beyond the tipping line. In other words, the platform does not go outside of the drive chassis envelope. A perfect example of a Group A would be a scissor lift.

Conversely, a Group B machine has a design that allows the platform to extend beyond the tipping line. A great example of a Group B machine would be an articulating or telescopic boom.

A MEWP Type is in reference to the equipment’s ability to travel:

  • Type 1 – Traveling is allowed only with the MEWP in its stowed position
  • Type 2 – Traveling with the work platform in the elevated position is controlled from a point on the chassis
  • Type 3 – Traveling with the work platform in the elevated travel position is controlled from a point on the work platform

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Type 2 MEWPS are not as common as the others. In fact, Genie does not manufacture any machines within this category so for the purposes of this article, I will focus on Type 1 and Type 3 machines only.

An example of a Group A, Type 1 MEWP would be the Genie® AWP™ Super Series manually-propelled lifts. The platform never extends beyond the tipping line, and the machine is designed to only be moved with the platform in the stowed position.

The Genie TZ™-34 and TZ-50 trailer-mounted booms are examples of a Group B, Type 1 MEWP. The platform is designed to extend beyond the tipping line, and the machine is designed to only be moved with the platform in the stowed position.

An example of a Group A, Type 3 MEWP would be electric or rough terrain scissor lifts. The main platform never extends beyond the tipping line, and machine travel is controlled from the platform controls.

Articulated and telescopic booms are examples of a Group B, Type 3 MEWP. The platform is designed to extend the tipping line, and machine travel is controlled from the platform controls.

Equipment Design Standards

In addition to the terminology and language changes in the new ANSI A92 and CSA B354 standards, the standards also include several big changes to the equipment itself:

  • Platform Load Sense (aka Overload System or Load Sense System) — All MEWPs will be required to continuously check the weight in the platform and disable certain functions if the load is above the platform load limit.
  • Dynamic Terrain Sensing — Drive and certain boom functions must be disabled when out of their slope limit and functions restricted only to those that safely return the machine to terrain that is within limits.
  • Indoor-only Machines — Allows for the development of smaller, lighter-weight MEWPs bearing an “indoor only” rating because these MEWPs cannot be used in conditions where they might be subjected to any wind.

In addition to the changes highlighted above, there will be many other alterations including:

  • Toeguards on work platform entrances
  • Prohibited use of chain gates and flexible gates
  • Reduced lift and lower speeds on some models.

Safe Use and Planning

The user must develop a Safe Use Program specific to MEWPS which must include, but not be limited to:

  1. Performing a site risk assessment;
  2. Selection, provision and use of a suitable MEWP and associated equipment;
  3. An assessment that the support surface is adequate to support the weight of the MEWP;
  4. MEWP maintenance including inspections and repairs as required;
  5. Inform the operator of local site requirements and warn and provide the means to protect against identified hazards;
  6. Have a trained and qualified supervisor to monitor the performance or the work of the operator;
  7. Prevention of unauthorized use of the MEWP;
  8. Safety of persons not involved in the operation of the MEWP.

Risk Assessment and Rescue Planning

The risks associated with the task specific to MEWP operations shall be identified. These might be associated with the location where the work is to be carried out, the nature of the MEWP or the personnel, materials and equipment to be carried.

  • Identify control measures
  • Identify safe work procedures
  • Rescue from height
  • Communicate the results

The user must develop a written rescue plan that will be carried out in the case of machine breakdown, platform entanglement or fall from platform. The plan shall be put in writing and become part of the company’s training manual.

All occupants must receive training that explains procedures to follow if they fall and await rescue or witness another worker’s fall. This plan must limit the time that a properly restrained worker hangs suspended in the air. Rescue plans can include the following:

  1. Self-rescue – by the person involved
  2. Assisted rescue – by others in the work area
  3. Technical rescue – by emergency services

Training (Operators, Supervisors & Occupants)

To prepare for these standards changes, it is important for users (most commonly the employer) to understand several significant changes.

Supervisor Training (ANSI only)
The user must ensure that all personnel that directly supervise MEWP operators are trained in the following areas:

  • Proper selection of the correct MEWP for the work to be performed;
  • The rules, regulations and standards that apply to MEWPs, including the provisions for safe use as defined in ANSI A92.22 Training and Familiarization, and the work being performed;
  • Potential hazards associated with use of MEWPs and the means to protect against identified hazards;
  • Knowledge that the manufacturer’s operating manual(s) are an integral part of the equipment and need to be stored properly in the weather resistant compartment on the MEWP.

Occupant Training
The MEWP operator must ensure that all occupants in the platform have a basic level of knowledge to work safely on the MEWP.

  • The requirement to use fall protection and the location of fall protection anchors;
  •  Factors including how their actions could affect stability;
  • Safe use of MEWP accessories they are assigned to use;
  • Site specific work procedures the occupants must follow related to the operation of the MEWP;
  • Hazards related to the task at hand and their avoidance;
  • Manufacturer’s warnings and instructions;
  • At least one of the occupants must be provided with the knowledge to operate the controls in an emergency where the operator cannot.

Maintenance and Repair Personnel Training

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Users must ensure that maintenance and repair personnel are trained by a qualified person to inspect and maintain the MEWP in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations, as well as ANSI and CSA standards.

In the case where a MEWP is being rented, arrangements must be made by the owner to identify the entity that will be responsible for the inspections and maintenance activities described in the standard:

Frequent Inspections — When the MEWP is put into service or has been out of service for three months.

Annual Inspections — Performed no later than 13 months after the previous Annual Inspection.

Final Comments

This article only scratches the surface of the changes that the industry will be facing. We encourage you to purchase a copy of the standards for you to achieve a full understanding of the requirements. Do not to underestimate the impact the introduction of the new ANSI/CSA standards will have and start preparing now for a smoother transition.

To help you interpret what’s included in the new standards, we offer articles that will assist you in understanding the new requirements and provide ongoing suggestions and support to help you navigate the changes.

With the implementation of the updated ANSI/CSA standards, we continue to evaluate and manufacture our products to meet the most current industry standards worldwide and to provide our customers with innovative work at height solutions.

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Oregon OSHA

Construction Depot

Safety and health newsletter for the Oregon construction industry

February 22, 2016

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Graphic of an aerial lift accident

Aerial lifts: Don't forget to follow the manufacturer's instructions

What is the most important thing you should understand before you use an aerial lift? The information in the operator's manual. Many, if not most, work-related injuries involving aerial lifts happen when operators assume they know how to operate a lift, but do not follow the manufacturer's instructions. Regardless of the type of lift you use – a boom-supported lift or a scissor lift – you must follow the lift manufacturer's operating and maintenance instructions. Also, you must be trained by a person who understands the hazards associated with the lift.

What you must know

  • The manufacturer's instructions for operating the lift.
  • How to recognize and avoid operating hazards, such as overhead power-transmission lines.
  • The fall protection requirements associated with the lift.
  • How to handle materials on the lift and the lift's load capacity.
  • How to report lift defects or maintenance needs.

What you must do

  • Keep the operating manual with the lift.
  • Use the lift only for its intended purpose.
  • Know the lift's rated load capacity and don't exceed it.
  • Inspect the work area and the lift's path of travel for potential tip-over hazards.
  • Inspect the lift before using it to make sure that it is working properly.
  • Keep the lift level and stable; use outriggers and intermediate stabilizers.
  • Never move the lift when the boom is up and workers are on the platform, unless the manufacturer permits it.
  • Stand on the platform's floor. Don't sit or climb on the edge of the basket, guardrail, or midrail.
  • Close the access gate while you are working from the platform.
  • Stay at least 10 feet away from energized electrical power lines.
  • Never use the lift during severe weather.
  • Use warning signs or barricades to keep others out of the work area.
  • Never tie off to equipment or to a structure next to the platform.
  • Never use the lift to tow or pull anything.

Oregon OSHA's requirements for aerial lifts

How injuries happen: four examples

The following cases – taken from the Safety Notes column in past issues of Oregon OSHA's Resource newsletter – illustrate four different injury events involving aerial lifts. What did they have in common? The operators did not follow the instructions in the operator's manual.

Thumbnsil images of PDF containing Safety Notes

Thursday, 08 January 2015 01:37

Aerial Lift Electrocution

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UPDATE: Worker Killed in Mill Accident

POSTED BY  ON TUE, JAN 6, 2015 AT 1:19 PM

click to enlargeThe site of the accident. - GOOGLE MAPS
  • GOOGLE MAPS
  • The site of the accident.

The coroner’s office identified the victim of yesterday’s industrial accident as 64-year-old Mike Vander Veen of Forest Hill, California. The cause of death appears to be accidental electrocution, according to the office, and an autopsy is scheduled for Jan. 8.Deputy Coroner Trevor Enright declined to say who Vander Veen was working for, citing an ongoing California Occupational Safety and Health Administration investigation.Previously:A 64-year-old contract worker was killed this morning when his boom lift apparently came into contact with a high voltage line at an Arcata mill.After receiving emergency calls around 9 a.m., “crews found the basket approximately 25 feet in the air with the patient unconscious in the basket,” according to an Arcata Fire press release. “The boom was not in contact with the overhead electric transmission lines but was within inches of the lines. Firefighters immediately started coordinating with workers on scene to drain the hydraulic fluid of the boom to lower the basket and make access to the patient. After moving stacks of stock out of the way, they were able to lower the basket to the ground and paramedics determined that the man was dead.”The victim will not be identified until his next of kin has been notified. The mill, OSHA, PG&E and emergency responders are investigating the accident. It's unclear who the victim was working for at the time of the accident.From Arcata Fire:
Manila, CA- (January 6, 2015)- At approximately 9:00 this morning, Arcata Fire District and Arcata-Mad River Ambulance were dispatched to 2593 New Navy Base Road for an industrial accident involving a possible electrocution. While responding to the scene, emergency personnel received further information indicating that there was a patient in the basket of a boom truck and he may have come in contact with a high-voltage power line.Arcata Fire crews found the basket approximately 25 feet in the air with the patient unconscious in the basket. The boom was not in contact with the overhead electric transmission lines but was within inches of the lines. Firefighters immediately started coordinating with workers on scene to drain the hydraulic fluid of the boom to lower the basket and make access to the patient. After moving stacks of stock out of the way, they were able to lower the basket to the ground and paramedics determined that the man was dead.Arcata Fire District is currently coordinating with the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Department, OSHA, PG&E and the mill management on this investigation. The name of the victim is not being released at this time pending notification of next of kin.Arcata Fire responded with two Chief Officers, one engine and one truck. Humboldt Bay Fire provided one Chief Officer and one engine to help cover the fire district. This tragic incident serves as a reminder to everyone to be careful whenever working around power lines. Remember to look up, down and all around when working near power lines and if you see downed power lines, never touch them.
From the sheriff’s office:
On Tuesday, January 6, 2015, at about 9:15 AM, the Sheriff’s Office received a call for service regarding an industrial accident that had occurred at the Emerson Mill, located at 2593 Hwy 255, near Arcata. Sheriff’s Deputies responded to the scene, along with Arcata Fire, and PG&E personnel. Once on scene, Deputies met with on-site Safety Personnel, and learned a 64 year old man had been fatally injured in the industrial accident. The victim was a Contractor, who was conducting tests and repairs on equipment at the facility. It was reported the man was operating a boom lift, and may have come into contact with a power line.
Cal/OSHA was notified, and will be responding to the scene. The investigation was turned over to the Coroner’s Office.The name of the man will not be released until next of kin has been notified.
 
Thursday, 09 October 2014 20:22

Electrocution hazards on aerial lifts

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This is a great example as to why your workers need appropriate training on aerial lifts before using them.  Does your training company provide training on overhead hazards, electrocution, work place inspections?  Or does your training company simply give you’re a 30 minute class and then issue them a qualified operator card?

 

Source - Youtube, WorksafeBC

 

 


 

 
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"Herald-Tribune"

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Fall protection requirements for aerial lifts

Aerial lift fall protection

If you are going to operate an aerial lift, you must be trained how to use it and you must be protected from falling or being ejected when you are on the platform. The type of fall protection you need depends on the type of lift you use. The American National Standards Institute defines and sets operating standards for four different types of aerial lifts:

  • Vehicle-mounted elevating and rotating lifts (ANSI A92.2 devices)
  • Manually propelled elevating work platforms (ANSI A92.3 devices)
  • Boom-supported elevating work platforms (ANSI A92.5 devices)
  • Self-propelled elevating work platforms and scissor lifts (ANSI A92.6 devices)

What are Oregon OSHA's requirements? Here is a summary.

Vehicle-mounted elevating and rotating aerial lifts (ANSI/SAI A92.2)

Platforms other than buckets or baskets must have guardrails, midrails, and toeboards.

Each worker must use a personal fall protection system with a body belt or body harness when on the platform. A body belt may be used only in a personal fall restraint system when the lanyard is short enough and rigged to the lift's designated anchor point so the worker cannot climb the guardrail or be ejected out of the platform. If a body harness is used, it must be part of a personal fall arrest system. The aerial lift must be able to withstand the vertical and lateral loads of an arrested fall.

Each worker must stand firmly on the platform at all times and must not sit or climb on the edge of the basket.

The manufacturer's operating manual must be with the equipment. Workers must follow all manufacturers' operating and maintenance instructions and recommendations.

Manually propelled elevating aerial platforms (ANSI/SIA A92.3)

Workers cannot be on the platform when the lift is moved horizontally.

The platform must have guardrails 42 inches high (plus or minus three inches), midrails, and toeboards at least four inches high.

Platforms must be designed so that if sections of guardrails are removed, there are anchor points for a lanyard. While using the lift, workers must ensure that the guardrails are installed according to the manufacturer's instructions and that access gates are closed.

Each worker must stand firmly on the platform at all times and must not use ladders or any other means for additional height.

The manufacturer's operating manual must be with the equipment. Workers must follow all manufacturers' operating and maintenance instructions and recommendations.

Boom-supported elevating work platforms (ANSI/SIA A92.5)

The platform must have guardrails 42 inches high (plus or minus three inches), midrails, and toeboards at least four inches high.

While using the lift, workers must ensure that guardrails are installed according to the manufacturer's instructions and access gates are closed.

Each worker must use a personal fall protection system with a body belt or body harness when on the platform. A body belt may only be used in a personal fall restraint system when the lanyard is short enough and rigged to the lift's designated anchor point so that the worker cannot climb the guardrail or be ejected from the platform. If a body harness is used, it must be part of a personal fall arrest system. The aerial lift must be able to withstand the vertical and lateral loads of an arrested fall.

The manufacturer's operating manual must be with the equipment. Workers must follow all manufacturers' operating and maintenance instructions and recommendations.

Self-propelled elevating work platforms (ANSI/SIA A92.6)

The platform must be enclosed by guardrails 42 inches high (plus or minus three inches) midrails, and toeboards at least four inches high.

While using the lift, workers must ensure that guardrails are installed according to the manufacturer's instructions and that access gates are closed.

Each worker must stand firmly on the platform at all times and must not sit or climb on the edge of the basket.

The manufacturer's operating manual must be with the equipment. Workers must follow all manufacturers' operating and maintenance instructions and recommendations.

Required training for aerial lift operators

Workers who use aerial lifts must have training that meets the requirements in 1926.454 (Scaffolding, Division 3, Subdivision L). Here are the key requirements:

Workers must be trained by a person qualified in the subject matter of the lift they will use. They must be able to recognize the hazards associated with the lift and must know how to control or minimize the hazards.

Training must cover:

  • Electrical hazards, such as overhead power-transmission lines
  • Fall hazards and methods to control them
  • Ways to protect people below from falling objects
  • How to use the lift
  • The lift's load capacity
  • The Oregon OSHA rules that apply to aerial lifts (see Oregon OSHA rules below)

Retraining

Workers must be retrained when they do not safely use the lift. Other reasons for retraining include worksite changes that create new hazards and changes in the types of scaffolds, fall protection, or falling-object protection used.

Safe practices

Keep in mind the following when using an aerial lift:

  • Use the lift only for its intended purpose and follow the manufacturer's instructions.
  • Keep the operating manual with the lift.
  • Keep the lift level and stable; use outriggers and intermediate stabilizers.
  • Never move the lift when the boom is up and workers are on the platform, unless allowed by the manufacturer.
  • Inspect the work area or path of travel for potential tip-over hazards.
  • Stand on the platform floor. Don't sit or climb on the edge of the basket, guardrail, or midrail.
  • Be sure to close the access gate while you're working from the platform.
  • Inspect the lift before using it to make sure that it's working properly and in good condition.
  • Know the lift's rated load capacity and don't exceed it.
  • Stay at least 10 feet away from energized electrical power lines.
  • Never use the lift during severe weather.
  • Use warning signs or barricades to keep others out of the work area.
  • Never tie off to other equipment or to a structure next to the platform.
  • Never use the lift to tow or pull anything.

Where to find more information

Oregon OSHA rules for aerial lifts

  • 1926.453 Aerial lifts
  • 437-003-0071 Manually propelled elevating aerial platforms
  • 437-003-0073 Boom supported elevating work platforms
  • 437-003-0074 Scissor lifts – self-propelled elevating work platforms
  • 1926.454 Training requirements

Program Directive A-242: Fall Protection: Personnel Lifts Used in Construction

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The American Rental Association (ARA), the Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM), the Associated Equipment Distributors (AED), the International Powered Access Federation (IPAF) and the Scaffold Industry Association (SIA) have joined forces to help develop the document, “Statement of Best Practices of General Training and Familiarization for Aerial Work Platform Equipment.”

The document’s content addresses:

  • Educating the industry on the industry-recognized-and-supported standards, including the American National Standards Institute/Scaffold Industry Association (ANSI/SIA) A92 Standards and OSHA regulations;
  • Presenting best practices and minimum general training guidelines for AWP operators;
  • Emphasizing the differences between general training and familiarization to all parties responsible; and
  • Clarifying minimum qualifications of the trainer.

“All in the industry – rental operators, manufacturers, associations for those entities, educators, regulators, users and operators – are dedicated to the best practices related to the training and safe use of aerial work platform (AWP) equipment,” the document states. “Proper use achieves successful project completion and assures operator safety. This is particularly critical when working with AWP equipment, which offers so much versatility and assistance to those who use it. The priority of all in the industry is to make sure that everyone who owns and operates AWP equipment has a clear understanding of his or her role in the requirements for the safe use of that equipment.”

The 20-page document can be downloaded as a PDF at http://www.ipaf.org/fileadmin/user_upload/documents/us/AWP_BPG_2010.pdf.

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