Cite Safety Blog

Aerial Lift Training

ANSI (United States) and CSA (Canada) standards have, for almost four decades, provided best practices for safe, reliable access to work at height and have delivered a consistent benchmark for safe machine design in North America. Standards set a safety level for all participants in the market. Good standards also bring global markets closer together, driving commonality and stronger market competition.

Originally published by Aerial Pros Author Scott Owyen - Training Manager Genie Aerial Pros: https://www.genielift.com/en/about-genie/news/2018/12/04/everything-is-changing

What is the most important thing you should understand before you use an aerial lift? The information in the operator's manual. Many, if not most, work-related injuries involving aerial lifts happen when operators assume they know how to operate a lift, but do not follow the manufacturer's instructions. Regardless of the type of lift you use – a boom-supported lift or a scissor lift – you must follow the lift manufacturer's operating and maintenance instructions. Also, you must be trained by a person who understands the hazards associated with the lift.

Originally published by Oregon OSHA Construction Depot: https://osha.oregon.gov/pubs/newsletters/constructiondepot/OSHAConstructionDepot/2016/02/aerial-lifts-follow-instructions.html

Thursday, 08 January 2015 01:37

Aerial Lift Electrocution

UPDATE: Worker Killed in Mill Accident

POSTED BY  ON TUE, JAN 6, 2015 AT 1:19 PM

click to enlargeThe site of the accident. - GOOGLE MAPS
  • GOOGLE MAPS
  • The site of the accident.

The coroner’s office identified the victim of yesterday’s industrial accident as 64-year-old Mike Vander Veen of Forest Hill, California. The cause of death appears to be accidental electrocution, according to the office, and an autopsy is scheduled for Jan. 8.Deputy Coroner Trevor Enright declined to say who Vander Veen was working for, citing an ongoing California Occupational Safety and Health Administration investigation.Previously:A 64-year-old contract worker was killed this morning when his boom lift apparently came into contact with a high voltage line at an Arcata mill.After receiving emergency calls around 9 a.m., “crews found the basket approximately 25 feet in the air with the patient unconscious in the basket,” according to an Arcata Fire press release. “The boom was not in contact with the overhead electric transmission lines but was within inches of the lines. Firefighters immediately started coordinating with workers on scene to drain the hydraulic fluid of the boom to lower the basket and make access to the patient. After moving stacks of stock out of the way, they were able to lower the basket to the ground and paramedics determined that the man was dead.”The victim will not be identified until his next of kin has been notified. The mill, OSHA, PG&E and emergency responders are investigating the accident. It's unclear who the victim was working for at the time of the accident.From Arcata Fire:
Manila, CA- (January 6, 2015)- At approximately 9:00 this morning, Arcata Fire District and Arcata-Mad River Ambulance were dispatched to 2593 New Navy Base Road for an industrial accident involving a possible electrocution. While responding to the scene, emergency personnel received further information indicating that there was a patient in the basket of a boom truck and he may have come in contact with a high-voltage power line.Arcata Fire crews found the basket approximately 25 feet in the air with the patient unconscious in the basket. The boom was not in contact with the overhead electric transmission lines but was within inches of the lines. Firefighters immediately started coordinating with workers on scene to drain the hydraulic fluid of the boom to lower the basket and make access to the patient. After moving stacks of stock out of the way, they were able to lower the basket to the ground and paramedics determined that the man was dead.Arcata Fire District is currently coordinating with the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Department, OSHA, PG&E and the mill management on this investigation. The name of the victim is not being released at this time pending notification of next of kin.Arcata Fire responded with two Chief Officers, one engine and one truck. Humboldt Bay Fire provided one Chief Officer and one engine to help cover the fire district. This tragic incident serves as a reminder to everyone to be careful whenever working around power lines. Remember to look up, down and all around when working near power lines and if you see downed power lines, never touch them.
From the sheriff’s office:
On Tuesday, January 6, 2015, at about 9:15 AM, the Sheriff’s Office received a call for service regarding an industrial accident that had occurred at the Emerson Mill, located at 2593 Hwy 255, near Arcata. Sheriff’s Deputies responded to the scene, along with Arcata Fire, and PG&E personnel. Once on scene, Deputies met with on-site Safety Personnel, and learned a 64 year old man had been fatally injured in the industrial accident. The victim was a Contractor, who was conducting tests and repairs on equipment at the facility. It was reported the man was operating a boom lift, and may have come into contact with a power line.
Cal/OSHA was notified, and will be responding to the scene. The investigation was turned over to the Coroner’s Office.The name of the man will not be released until next of kin has been notified.
 
Thursday, 09 October 2014 20:22

Electrocution hazards on aerial lifts

 

This is a great example as to why your workers need appropriate training on aerial lifts before using them.  Does your training company provide training on overhead hazards, electrocution, work place inspections?  Or does your training company simply give you’re a 30 minute class and then issue them a qualified operator card?

 

Source - Youtube, WorksafeBC

 

 


 

 

Fall protection requirements for aerial lifts

Aerial lift fall protection

If you are going to operate an aerial lift, you must be trained how to use it and you must be protected from falling or being ejected when you are on the platform. The type of fall protection you need depends on the type of lift you use. The American National Standards Institute defines and sets operating standards for four different types of aerial lifts:

  • Vehicle-mounted elevating and rotating lifts (ANSI A92.2 devices)
  • Manually propelled elevating work platforms (ANSI A92.3 devices)
  • Boom-supported elevating work platforms (ANSI A92.5 devices)
  • Self-propelled elevating work platforms and scissor lifts (ANSI A92.6 devices)

What are Oregon OSHA's requirements? Here is a summary.

Vehicle-mounted elevating and rotating aerial lifts (ANSI/SAI A92.2)

Platforms other than buckets or baskets must have guardrails, midrails, and toeboards.

Each worker must use a personal fall protection system with a body belt or body harness when on the platform. A body belt may be used only in a personal fall restraint system when the lanyard is short enough and rigged to the lift's designated anchor point so the worker cannot climb the guardrail or be ejected out of the platform. If a body harness is used, it must be part of a personal fall arrest system. The aerial lift must be able to withstand the vertical and lateral loads of an arrested fall.

Each worker must stand firmly on the platform at all times and must not sit or climb on the edge of the basket.

The manufacturer's operating manual must be with the equipment. Workers must follow all manufacturers' operating and maintenance instructions and recommendations.

Manually propelled elevating aerial platforms (ANSI/SIA A92.3)

Workers cannot be on the platform when the lift is moved horizontally.

The platform must have guardrails 42 inches high (plus or minus three inches), midrails, and toeboards at least four inches high.

Platforms must be designed so that if sections of guardrails are removed, there are anchor points for a lanyard. While using the lift, workers must ensure that the guardrails are installed according to the manufacturer's instructions and that access gates are closed.

Each worker must stand firmly on the platform at all times and must not use ladders or any other means for additional height.

The manufacturer's operating manual must be with the equipment. Workers must follow all manufacturers' operating and maintenance instructions and recommendations.

Boom-supported elevating work platforms (ANSI/SIA A92.5)

The platform must have guardrails 42 inches high (plus or minus three inches), midrails, and toeboards at least four inches high.

While using the lift, workers must ensure that guardrails are installed according to the manufacturer's instructions and access gates are closed.

Each worker must use a personal fall protection system with a body belt or body harness when on the platform. A body belt may only be used in a personal fall restraint system when the lanyard is short enough and rigged to the lift's designated anchor point so that the worker cannot climb the guardrail or be ejected from the platform. If a body harness is used, it must be part of a personal fall arrest system. The aerial lift must be able to withstand the vertical and lateral loads of an arrested fall.

The manufacturer's operating manual must be with the equipment. Workers must follow all manufacturers' operating and maintenance instructions and recommendations.

Self-propelled elevating work platforms (ANSI/SIA A92.6)

The platform must be enclosed by guardrails 42 inches high (plus or minus three inches) midrails, and toeboards at least four inches high.

While using the lift, workers must ensure that guardrails are installed according to the manufacturer's instructions and that access gates are closed.

Each worker must stand firmly on the platform at all times and must not sit or climb on the edge of the basket.

The manufacturer's operating manual must be with the equipment. Workers must follow all manufacturers' operating and maintenance instructions and recommendations.

Required training for aerial lift operators

Workers who use aerial lifts must have training that meets the requirements in 1926.454 (Scaffolding, Division 3, Subdivision L). Here are the key requirements:

Workers must be trained by a person qualified in the subject matter of the lift they will use. They must be able to recognize the hazards associated with the lift and must know how to control or minimize the hazards.

Training must cover:

  • Electrical hazards, such as overhead power-transmission lines
  • Fall hazards and methods to control them
  • Ways to protect people below from falling objects
  • How to use the lift
  • The lift's load capacity
  • The Oregon OSHA rules that apply to aerial lifts (see Oregon OSHA rules below)

Retraining

Workers must be retrained when they do not safely use the lift. Other reasons for retraining include worksite changes that create new hazards and changes in the types of scaffolds, fall protection, or falling-object protection used.

Safe practices

Keep in mind the following when using an aerial lift:

  • Use the lift only for its intended purpose and follow the manufacturer's instructions.
  • Keep the operating manual with the lift.
  • Keep the lift level and stable; use outriggers and intermediate stabilizers.
  • Never move the lift when the boom is up and workers are on the platform, unless allowed by the manufacturer.
  • Inspect the work area or path of travel for potential tip-over hazards.
  • Stand on the platform floor. Don't sit or climb on the edge of the basket, guardrail, or midrail.
  • Be sure to close the access gate while you're working from the platform.
  • Inspect the lift before using it to make sure that it's working properly and in good condition.
  • Know the lift's rated load capacity and don't exceed it.
  • Stay at least 10 feet away from energized electrical power lines.
  • Never use the lift during severe weather.
  • Use warning signs or barricades to keep others out of the work area.
  • Never tie off to other equipment or to a structure next to the platform.
  • Never use the lift to tow or pull anything.

Where to find more information

Oregon OSHA rules for aerial lifts

  • 1926.453 Aerial lifts
  • 437-003-0071 Manually propelled elevating aerial platforms
  • 437-003-0073 Boom supported elevating work platforms
  • 437-003-0074 Scissor lifts – self-propelled elevating work platforms
  • 1926.454 Training requirements

Program Directive A-242: Fall Protection: Personnel Lifts Used in Construction

The American Rental Association (ARA), the Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM), the Associated Equipment Distributors (AED), the International Powered Access Federation (IPAF) and the Scaffold Industry Association (SIA) have joined forces to help develop the document, “Statement of Best Practices of General Training and Familiarization for Aerial Work Platform Equipment.”

The document’s content addresses:

  • Educating the industry on the industry-recognized-and-supported standards, including the American National Standards Institute/Scaffold Industry Association (ANSI/SIA) A92 Standards and OSHA regulations;
  • Presenting best practices and minimum general training guidelines for AWP operators;
  • Emphasizing the differences between general training and familiarization to all parties responsible; and
  • Clarifying minimum qualifications of the trainer.

“All in the industry – rental operators, manufacturers, associations for those entities, educators, regulators, users and operators – are dedicated to the best practices related to the training and safe use of aerial work platform (AWP) equipment,” the document states. “Proper use achieves successful project completion and assures operator safety. This is particularly critical when working with AWP equipment, which offers so much versatility and assistance to those who use it. The priority of all in the industry is to make sure that everyone who owns and operates AWP equipment has a clear understanding of his or her role in the requirements for the safe use of that equipment.”

The 20-page document can be downloaded as a PDF at http://www.ipaf.org/fileadmin/user_upload/documents/us/AWP_BPG_2010.pdf.

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